• New U-500 insulin syringe

    A new syringe to administer concentrated Humulin R U-500 (insulin regular) will soon be available from the manufacturer, BD. The syringe measures U-500 insulin doses ranging from 25 units to 250 units in 5-unit segments. The new syringe is expected to be available in November 2016. Once the U-500 syringe is available, a U-100 syringe or tuberculin syringe should no longer be used to administer U-500 insulin in healthcare facilities or in the home.

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  • Breathing easier: Safe use of inhaled medicines

    Inhalation is the best way to take a medicine used to treat asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (See the Sidebar for information about asthma and COPD.) The medicine acts faster to control breathing if inhaled directly into the lungs. Also, inhaled medicines can often be taken in a lower dose than an oral tablet of the medicine. This can help to reduce the risk of bad side effects.

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  • Talk before you take

    “Talk Before You Take” is a national awareness campaign launched by the National Council on Patient Information and Education (NCPIE) to encourage and improve communications between healthcare providers (HCPs) and patients about the benefits and potential risks of prescription medicines.

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  • Become more familiar with the medicine you take... Learn the generic name

    Medicines all have one generic name and perhaps one or more brand names. The brand name is chosen by the drug company. The generic name is assigned by an official body, the United States Adopted Names (USAN) Council. You probably know, for example, that Advil and Motrin are brand names for the generic medicine ibuprofen. Knowing that Advil, Motrin, and ibuprofen are all the same medicine alerts you to an important risk—that taking these medicines together could add up to an overdose.

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  • 7 Simple Ways to Protect Your Child From an Accidental Poisoning

    Have you ever thought about where medicines are kept in your home through the eyes of your child? Medicines left on counters, nightstands, in purses and bags, or on the ground are easily within reach of a young child. What's more, many medicines are brightly colored and look like candy, making them appetizing to children.

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