Receiving a Prescription

 

In 2007, the drug company that makes Omacor (omega-3-acid ethyl esters) changed the name of the medicine to Lovaza to prevent confusion with another medicine, Amicar (aminocaproic acid). Lovaza lowers triglycerides, and Amicar treats bleeding caused by problems with the blood clotting system.

A pregnant woman was given a prescription for "PNV" tablets. The doctor used this abbreviation for "prenatal vitamins." The pharmacist mistakenly thought that PNV stood for "penicillin VK," an antibiotic. He filled the woman's prescription with penicillin tablets in error.

A mother picked up a refill for her child for Strattera (atomoxetine), a drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The capsules were a different color than with previous refills. Even though the prescription bottle said Strattera 60 mg, the mother called the pharmacy to check.

 

When you take a prescription to the pharmacy, you may have to wait for a period of time until it is ready. You are probably anxious to get home and may not realize just what your pharmacist is doing for you during that time. Here's a look at what your pharmacist typically does to make sure the medicine is safe and right for you.

A pediatrician prescribed 1/4 teaspoonful of Rondec-DM syrup (brompheniramine, dextromethorphan, and pseudoephedrine) four times each day for a child with a bad cold. This medicine is used to treat coughing and a runny or stuffy nose.

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Medication Safety Alerts

FDA Safety Alerts

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